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Collaborate Through Research, Partner for Progress

Bringing researchers around the world for faster delivery of benefits from science and research.

IRPC Associates

Dr. Pam McGrath, B.Soc.Wk., MA., Ph D
NHMRC Senior Research Fellow & Director, International Program of Psycho-Social Health Research (IPP-SHR), Central Queensland University, Brisbane Qld 4702, Australia. Website: www.ipp-shr.cqu.edu.au

I am honored to be the Chairperson of the IRPC Australian Chapter- an organization committed for the multidisciplinary development of third world countries. I am very much impressed on its first major project-the Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer. I am extending my service to the journal as the Editor from Australia.

"The first truly multi-disciplinary journal - it has contribution from the full range of health and allied health professionals (medicine, nursing, social work, dietitians etc). Our journal is not just sent to doctors but to a wide range of health professionals so we reach a wider audience and are instrumental in creating a shared space where we all work together. Most importantly, however, I believe the work of the journal is about the developed and the developing world holding hands and working collectively together".

Dr. Carina Berterö
Associate Professor, Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE- 581 85 Linköping Sweden, Tel: + 46 13 227768 , Fax: + 46 13 123285, E-mail: carbe@imv.liu.se

"IRPC and its major objective of supporting research in science and medicine in the developing and under developing countries of the world has a significant importance when sharing knowledge and activities to understand each others concern in terms of cancer diseases and palliative care. IRPC could function as a key resource worldwide for health care professionals facing a challenging future. Honoring scientists internationally for their outstanding achievements could channelise their research interest and knowledge suitable for application on existing problems in the developing and under developing countries."

Dr. Alina Popescu, PhD
Radiation Oncology Department, University of Washington Medical Centre, Seattle, USA

"I am proud to be the chairperson of the International Research Promotion Council (IRPC) American Chapter. IRPC is one of the few organizations dedicated to recognize and award research in science and medicine in the whole world. The IRPC scientists from around the world have the opportunity to unite their efforts in raising the awareness of the health and economic problems in the third world countries. Together, we can make a difference in many people's lives. In our global family, poverty and diseases are everyone's problem. The IRPC has been constituted and promoted by enthusiastic well wishers of research from the health care and scientific community. Our organization is a non-governmental and a non-profit organization structured to provide scientific incentives for the betterment of socio-economic enhancement of the civilization of the developing and under developing countries."

IRPC Asia-Pacific Chapter has crucial responsibilities and major tasks to be fulfilled. Majority of the countries in these continents are developing or even underdeveloped countries. Our important responsibility is to bring in advanced technology, resources and information from the developed countries for the benefit of the third world countries. We work in close co-operation with the leading scientists of the world to fulfill our noble objectives.

Prof. A.D. Harries, OBE, MD, FRCP
Chairman, IRPC African Chapter, British High Commission, Malawi, Central Africa

"As a researcher in the developing world, it is an enormous boost to morale for the person and the associated research team to be honored by IRPC. In Malawi, this honor went to us in the National TB Control Programme in 2000. It was reported in the National Press and recognized by the Vice President of the country. Research in poor countries is often done under difficult circumstances and in some degree of isolation. Such recognition by the IRPC helps the researchers to work hard and to realize that their endeavors are appreciated in the wider world".

Dr. Linda L. Reaby, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Canberra, Australia

Through their noble activities, The IRPC, made up of prominent medical scientists, has validated the importance of nursing research, and its benefits to quality patient care. Nurses are in a unique position to undertake important clinical research in the developing and underdeveloped countries. They are with the patients the majority of the time in the acute care settings. They can identify areas where research is applicable, and they can contribute significantly to evidence based practice. Hopefully, health care administrators and other health professionals will begin to recognize the potential of nursing research and begin to nurture and support nurses who undertake research activities.

Dr. Bruce Richardson, MD PhD
Professor, Department of Medicine, Chief, Section of Rheumatology, Ann Arbor VA Hospital, USA

It is clear that majority of the people of our world have health problems which are insufficiently addressed, due in part to lack of access to high quality medical care, and in part to health problems unique to their environment and social situations. Approaches to this problem need to be multifaceted, and will encompass basic research into diseases including cancers, infectious diseases, and others, as well as developing new models of health care delivery to assure worldwide access to the best health care available. The IRPC has focused on these important issues, and their efforts will help bring attention to these problems by leaders in multiple areas.

Dr. J. L. Bams, MD
Intensivist-Anesthesiologist, Cardio thoracic Intensive Care Unit, Department of Cardio thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands

We should emphasize that one of the objectives of IRPC is also to search for and to find methods and techniques, which are applicable and affordable in the developing and underdeveloped countries. This is, for instance, particularly true for gastric intramucosal pH monitoring, by which method the virtue of its easiness is well suited for usage in the third and undeveloped countries. The awards and the honor bestowed by IRPC to leading scientists are very encouraging for those researchers who receive such awards. This noble work of IRPC has to be promoted.

Dr. Ronald F. Dodson, PhD, FCCP
Vice President for Research, The University of Texas Health Center at Tyler, Tyler, USA

The major objective of the International Research Promotion Council is to work towards solving vital problems facing the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world by encouraging achievements in research and medicine which will assist in offering solutions for these problems. The organization realizes a global effort is extremely important in addressing these issues and has chosen to recognize outstanding scholars and eminent scientists throughout the world whose research has made significant contributions toward addressing these issues. The organization in recognizing such individuals hopes to encourage other scientists to channel the focus of their research activities to contribute to the strategies necessary for finding management solutions to improve the quality of life of citizens in these developing nations.

Dr. Donald McLean, PhD
Senior Lecturer, School of Medical Radiation Sciences
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia.

IRPC is an international organization to assist the promotion of research in developing and underdeveloped countries. On a personal note I am active in investigating radiological issues involving radiation dose and quality of radiological images for diagnosis. Particularly I am concerned with the increasing dose problems of CT dose and am working to seek methods to contain this problem in Australia. I would be happy to set up links with other workers interested in these areas (including mammography) to see if through a collaborative effort, progress can be made to reduce patient doses. Similarly I am also involved in education in these areas and regulatory aspects and would also be interested to discuss common interests here with the aim of improving health conditions in third world countries.

Dr. George H. Sakorafas, MD, PhD
Department of Surgery, 251 Hellenic Air Force Hospital, Athens, Greece.

To contribute into the projects and programs of IRPC, we should emphasize the need for an international co-operation between scientists/researchers in the field of clinical medicine, research and academic activities, such as education, international meetings, etc. from both developed and developing countries of the world.

Dr. Judith E. Karp, MD
University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

The goals of the IRPC are an eloquent expression of the need for physician-scientists to address the challenge of ensuring optimal access to both standard and experimental medicine. This challenge is particularly great in developing and underdeveloped countries, and it is the obligation of the medical research community to focus our efforts in overcoming the obstacles to translation of basic science discovery into new and effective clinical approaches that are readily available to all who can benefit from them.

Dr. Richard Upton
Principal Medical Scientist/Senior Lecturer, Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Royal Adelaide Hospital/University of Adelaide, Australia

The IRPC is emerging as a vital conduit for communication between scientists and doctors in developed countries and their counterparts in developing and underdeveloped countries.

Prof. Jesus Prieto
Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Hepatology and Gene Therapy, Clinica Universitaria and Medical School, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

I congratulate IRPC for their efforts, aims and objectives, which are very important to conduct scientific research to the real needs of developing countries, which I believe is an essential duty of human solidarity. I am proud of being part of this organization.

Dr. Mary J. C. Hendrix, PhD
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.

I applaud the efforts taken by IRPC to illuminate the genuine needs of underdeveloped countries. May I suggest that we share it with the United Nations, WHO, and other international groups.

Prof. Hirsch Ruchlin, PhD
Professor of Economics in Public Health and Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA.

As for the objectives of IRPC, focusing on research problems important to developing economies is a high global priority. Illness knows no geographic barriers. Scientists in developed countries should make every effort to generalize their work so that it benefits all mankind. Highlighting barriers to implementation in third world economies and suggesting interventions to overcome these barriers should be a part of everyone's research agenda."

Dr. Robert Barouki
Director of Research, INSERM unite 490, Centre Universitaire des Saints-Peres, Universite Rene Descartes, Paris, France.

"Research in science and medicine should be considered a world-wide problem. Even if until now, a few countries have carried most of the input, the questions that research will have to answer should be relevant for everybody. I agree that significant efforts should be channeled to encourage and help biomedical research all over the world for which IRPC is devoted."

Dr. Margaret Fitch, RN, PhD
Toronto-Sunny brook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada

I understand that IRPC is a global organization linking scientists internationally. In order to make good decisions about patient care or health care delivery, sound information is necessary. Research has an important role in helping us know how best to improve health care by generating sound information. Without relevant research we are at risk of making inappropriate decisions about interventions, program development, and program implementation."

Prof. Toru Hachisuga, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of Fukuoka, Japan

I am glad to hear that the major objective of the International Research Promotion Council is to manage or solve the vital problems existing in the field of research in science and medicine in developing and underdeveloped countries of the world. I am actively investigating the issues of gynecologic oncology and pathology, especially in surgical pathologic aspects of the uterine cancer. These issues are very popular both in the developing and underdeveloped countries. I would be happy to set up links with other workers interested in these areas. I am also involved in education of gynecologic oncology and pathology. I hope that this important work of IRPC will be promoted.

Dr. Linda Haramati, MD
Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, USA.

The problems of the developing world certainly are relevant in the United States. Our country is multicultural and is built on a foundation of immigrants from around the world. Currently, at least half of all people living in New York City are immigrants or children of immigrants. Thus, the diseased that are endemic in other areas of the world are part of the regional environment in New York City. As AIDS and tuberculosis fluctuate in the rest of the world, they do in New York. Advances in basic knowledge, diagnosis and treatment of diseases that affect developing countries will advance the health of us all. I applaud the efforts of the IRPC in its noble endeavors.

Prof. Neville F. Hacker, MD
Gynaecological Cancer Centre, Royal Hospital for Women, Barker Street, Randwick NSW 2031, Australia.

"The remarkable effort of IRPC is directed towards making possible the research in the developing countries. Such great objective is being actively carried out attracting people who work in the field of science and research to invest in a matter otherwise not considered. In such a way IRPC offers to those countries the means to facilitate themselves in their growth. I would like to offer my personal contribution to such a great project. I believe that IRPC will meet the target, because they are working with a global effort. My very best congratulation."

Prof. Hassan Amir
1105, Jalna Blvd # 902, London, Ontario N6E 2S9, Canada.

Cancer in developing countries has received very little attention. Fewer facilities for Cancer diagnosing, registration and research results in under-reporting of Cancers from these areas. The majority of cancer occur in the developing world and will be increasing in the coming decades in this geographical region. Yet only a small part of the global health care resources are channeled towards these countries. Morbidity and mortality rates in most of the developing countries are high and lives are being lost for lack of basic healthcare. This burden of cancer is further compounded with the addition of HIV/AIDS associated cancers in these poor countries.

Therefore IRPC aims at creating an awareness about the dire situation in cancer care in developing world. IRPC also aims at protecting the rights of cancer patients for their treatment in developing countries by creating a "charter of rights for cancer patients".

Prof. Hassan Amir
1105, Jalna Blvd # 902, London, Ontario N6E 2S9, Canada.

Cancer in developing countries has received very little attention. Fewer facilities for Cancer diagnosing, registration and research results in under-reporting of Cancers from these areas. The majority of cancer occur in the developing world and will be increasing in the coming decades in this geographical region. Yet only a small part of the global health care resources are channeled towards these countries. Morbidity and mortality rates in most of the developing countries are high and lives are being lost for lack of basic healthcare. This burden of cancer is further compounded with the addition of HIV/AIDS associated cancers in these poor countries.

Therefore IRPC aims at creating an awareness about the dire situation in cancer care in developing world. IRPC also aims at protecting the rights of cancer patients for their treatment in developing countries by creating a "charter of rights for cancer patients".

Prof. Peter H. C. Lim
Advisor & Senior Consultant, Department of Urology, Changi General Hospital, 2 Simie Street 3 Singapore 529889

Researchers in developing & undeveloped countries often face insurmountable odds when doing basic scientific research due to lack of funding and adequate support facilities like laboratories, equipment, computers & trained personnel to assist. I believe that applied research may be more practical eg testing of new forms of medical equipment & their safety & efficacy. In respect of clinical research, drug trials are to be encouraged in these countries as recruitment is often easy & inexpensive to run. The frame work for developing counties to attract multinational countries to invest in research in their countries would be to have in place a sound background of knowledge of GCP Guidelines for Research which we can all start right away at little cost with strong encouragement from the local Health Authorities or Ministries of Health.

IRPC can lobby for governmental support & funding. If no funding is forthcoming, governments could at least facilitate the cutting off of red tape for inter-governmental cooperation thru'out the 3rd world & developing countries & perhaps provide training for countries that need such training.

Dr. Vita Golubovskaya
Ph.D, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Health Science Center, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville FL 32610-0286

I understand that the major objective of International Research Promotion Council is to manage the vital problems existing in the field of research in science and medicine in the developing countries of the world. I would like to help in finding out research solutions to manage the problems existing in the third world countries.

Univ.Prof.Dr. Werner Scheithauer
Department of Internal Medicine I,Division of Clinical Oncology, University Hospital, Waehringer Gueretel 18-20, A- 1090, Vienna, Austria.

I am aware of the significant problems existing in the field of research in science and medicine in the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world and the urgent need to find ways to improve the situation. I fully agree with the experts of the International Research Promotion Council (IRPC), an important organisation with a central role to sort out and try to solve these problems that a multi-national, i.e., global cooperative effort will be required in order to succeed. At least in the field of clinical oncology there is some concrete hope: a first step and excellent example has recently been effectuated by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO). About 1 year ago, in accordance with its mission to expand knowledge and share experiences, the Society has created a special Task Force to address the specific educational needs of healthcare specialists for clinical oncology in developing regions. A number of benefits and rights are being offered to potential members. Furthermore, tailor-made programs and activities designed to meet the needs of each region, special research grants and fellowship programs have become available/can be visited online

(www.esmo.org/WorkingGroups/developingCountries_taskForce.htm) or requested from the Developing Countries Task Force at the ESMO Head Office (e-mail:gracemarie@esmo.org). Comparable activities are also being offered now by the International Affairs Committee of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (www.asco.org) and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) with valuable International Cancer Technology Transfer Fellowships (www.fellows.uicc.org). Of course, these are only the very first steps done by established international professional societies in a particular though important research field, and numerous additional steps and efforts will be required to really improve the situation in the third world countries. Propagation of available resources and their maximal use, however, seems to be a prerequisite to cause pressure in these and other scientific societies to enlarge the offered research programs and funding. Keeping in mind that some cancer patients already benefit from the transferred/shared knowledge, we should try to continue to keep the spiral moving in the right direction.

Dr. Manuel SaltoTellez LMS MRCPath
Department of Pathology, National University of Singapore and Molecular Diagnosis Centre, and Department of Laboratory Medicine, National University Hospital, Singapore

IRPC is a global organization linking scientists internationally, with the immediate purpose of fostering research in developing and under-developed countries. At heart, every scientist in the world should have these aims as part of their Weltanschauung. During the years, the IRPC has established the Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer as an important tool to accomplish these goals, a major achievement of its kind. Personally, I believe that tissue and DNA banks in developing countries, which are relatively inexpensive to run, would be of great interest to other scientists world-wide, as well as to the molecular diagnostic and the pharmaceutical industries, and these could be a pertinent "entry door" for developing countries to research endeavors. In that sense, I feel that organizations such as the International Research Promotion Council (IRPC), involved in the provision of "...research and scientific incentives for the betterment of socio-economic enhancement of the civilization, mainly of, developing and under developed Afro- Asia- Pacific countries", could play a very active role in establishing translational research operations in the developing world.

Dr Russell D Petty, B.M.Sc.(hons) M.B.Ch.B. M.R.C.P.(U.K.)
Specialist Registrar and Clinical Research Fellow in Medical Oncology, Oncology Research Group, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Aberdeen, Institute of Medical Sciences, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN, Scotland, United Kingdom

Properly conducted and specifically directed research has enormous potential to transform the lives of people in the developing world. Harnessing the invaluable experience and expertise of clinicians and scientists in the developed world to facilitate this is not only necessary, but in many respects is also a moral obligation. The creation of an academic environment to train researchers and foster an environment of learning and scientific enquiry requires the assistance of researchers from the developed world both in directly practical terms but also in terms of the raised awareness they can bring towards these issues in their own countries and institutions. In my own field of oncology, the increasing burden of cancer in the developing world highlights the need for strategies to be formulated to address this. This includes both the provision of effective clinical services and also research into disease aetiology, prevention, and treatment ideally carried out in local institutions by local researchers who are ideally placed to address particular local needs. Supporting the development and work of such institutions is likely to have advantages to the countries in which they are established far beyond the field of oncology and cancer medicine.

Dr. Paula Ravasco
Unit of Nutrition and Metabolism Institute of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Lisbon, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa, Portugal

At its core, the International Research Promotion Council (IRPC) is becoming one of the world's foremost organizations for rewarding scientific capacity and foster scientific research, by means of building one of the leading voices for science-based sustainable development in the developing and underdeveloped countries.

Specifically, IRPC recognizes supports and promotes excellence in scientific research in the third world countries, and with this promotion and recognition, it also facilitates contacts between individual scientists and institutions. IRPC owes much of its success to the great will and dedication of its founders and partners. Its utmost goal is to help build political and scientific leadership for science-based sustainable development in the developing world.

IRPC initiatives may be the key to promote joint work between academies, which may reach the citizens and advise decision-makers on the scientific aspects of critical global issues. The wide range of activities pursued through each of these partnerships is designed to promote scientific capacity in the developing world, and to highlight successful experiences in the application of science and technology to address economic, social and environmental problems of critical concern in the third world countries.

Dr. Andrew C. Wotherspoon
Department of Histopathology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW3 6JJ, UK

I agree that researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries face many problems in undertaking relevant clinical and scientific research and that this may impact on care in these areas. Not all research carried out in developed countries can be extrapolated through to other areas, particularly research that identifies new and/or expensive technology in applications to patient care. To overcome this, their needs to be partnerships between scientists in developed and developing countries with shared experiences/information and the salvage of expired equipment for use in less well-off areas. Additionally there need to be an appreciation that studies conducted specifically to address issues relating to disease diagnosis/management in deprived areas has as much value as those that use the most advanced technology/drugs.

Dr. Joseph J. Y. Sung, MD, Ph. D
Professor of Medicine, Chairman & Chief of service, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Research in developing and underdeveloped countries are hampered by a lack of funding, and hence incentive in the quest for excellence. This is most unfortunate, as these countries are often where biomedical research would translate into health promotion. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in the West should consider funding research in these countries as a charitable donation. IRPC can consider forming a Foundation with these donations to fund research where it is most needed."

Prof. Nicolas Tsavaris
Department of Pathophysiology, University of Athens, School of Medicine, "Laikon" General Hospital Athens GR 11527, Greece

It is true that researches in developing undeveloped countries are facing many problems, which have direct impact on the people of third world countries. We have to mention that most of these problems also exist partly in most of developed countries. This comes from the fact that the development of the research is in connection with many basic factors such as peace, political conditions, economic status, government rules and targets, nationality, religion, workforce, capability, etc

A basic point which needs clarification is that research is a second line factor for a human society. In the first line come peace, safety of people, education, providing of basic rules of living, tendency of formation and progress, and if all these are obtained, then you can think about research. Out of the economic basis, and all these factors, research must be oriented according to the nation or society needs, reliant to the potentialities that exist.

Prof. Nicolas Tsavaris
Department of Pathophysiology, University of Athens, School of Medicine, "Laikon" General Hospital Athens GR 11527, Greece

It is true that researches in developing undeveloped countries are facing many problems, which have direct impact on the people of third world countries. We have to mention that most of these problems also exist partly in most of developed countries. This comes from the fact that the development of the research is in connection with many basic factors such as peace, political conditions, economic status, government rules and targets, nationality, religion, workforce, capability, etc

A basic point which needs clarification is that research is a second line factor for a human society. In the first line come peace, safety of people, education, providing of basic rules of living, tendency of formation and progress, and if all these are obtained, then you can think about research. Out of the economic basis, and all these factors, research must be oriented according to the nation or society needs, reliant to the potentialities that exist.

Dr. Giandomenico Palka
Scienze Biomediche e di, Servizio di Genetica Umana, Ospedale Civile di Pescara, 66013 Chieti, Italy

"I think the International Research Promotion Council (IRPC) is a clever idea. In fact, recognising the talents of the researchers who work in different field in different countries and inviting them to a common forum to fight for the genuine causes of the third world countries is a good idea. It favors new contacts or referenced collaborations with the researchers and with their countries. I think everybody should help IRPC giving more strength to its final goal".

Dr. Radhouane Fakhfakh
Institut National de la Sante Publique (NNSP), 5-7, Bloc IV Rue, Khartoum (10 eme Estage Diplomat) 1002 le Belvedere-Tunis, Tunisia

"In developing countries the researchers in the medical domain meet difficulties of financing, support and of collaboration of institutes of international searches. Their searches are realized mostly in difficult conditions. And when they succeed, they find difficulties being recognized by the scientific community and will not so have an impact on the medical development of these countries. IRPC by promoting research activities in science and medicine and implementing research in developing and under developed countries has a great contribution in the development of the search in the third world. It has the great merit to recognize the researchers in developing countries that constitutes a praiseworthy effort in the ' improvement of the care of health and economical problems in the third world.

Dr. Osman Nuri Hatipoglu
Trakya University, Chest Medicine Department, Edirne-Turkey

Economic problems of developing and underdeveloped countries affect many areas like academic researches, and health system. Scientists working on different areas have difficulty on finding financial support for starting or completing their researches, and for attending congress, conferences, seminars, and training programs. At many universities of these countries technical background is insufficient for original scientific researches. I think that the most important assistance to be performed is to provide economic and technical supports for these scientists. I am glad to hear that the one of the major objective of IRPC is to play a pivotal role on solving the research problems in developing world. IRCP may provide financial, technical, and scientific supports to selected scientists from developing countries and, in this way, motivate them.

Dr. Naiquan Zheng, Ph. D
Coordinator of joint Biomechanics & Computer Modeling, American Sports Medicine Institute 1313 13th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35205

Yes, I agree with IRPC that the researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries are facing many problems, which has direct impact on the people of the third world countries. Researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries need to utilize limited resources to solve unique problems people are facing in their countries, pursue help from developed countries through collaboration, educational courses and other means. IRPC may provide such educational courses in the third world countries, through the Internet and publications. IRPC may also act as the matchmaker to help researchers in the third world countries to find volunteers (individuals or institutions) to help their research projects.

Dr. Sally P. Weinrich, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N.
Professor, School of Nursing, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40292

The vast majority of persons living in the Third World, who have treatable serious diseases, often go undiagnosed. Morbidity and mortality rates are very high. Historically, few resources have been channeled for Third World countries. Collaborative research can provide answers for both countries, especially in our current genetic era. It is critical that international research be undertaken with the basic principles of collaboration and mutual benefit.

Dr. CAN-SENG OOI
Copenhagen Business School, Department of International Economics and Management, Howitzvej 60, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark

As we function in a global environment, developed and developing countries must be aware that their existence is closely intertwined. We should be aware that international cultural, economic and social flows affect all aspects of local societies. Tourism is contributing to these flows. Tourism is often seen as a source of corruption to local social life albeit it brings about economic benefits. Social degradation is not a necessary outcome of tourism. Researchers should be helping different societies to benefit from tourism economically, as well as to use tourism resources to socially enhance local societies. IRPC can play the role of not only spreading this message but also showing how this can be done by disseminating tourism research results.

Dr. JOSE ANTONIO PUPPIM DE OLIVEIRA
Associate Professor,Brazilian School of Public and Business Administration - EBAPE, Getulio Vargas Foundation - FGV,Praia de Botafogo 190, room 507, CEP: 22253-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil

Researchers in less developed countries (LDCs) can contribute significantly to solve many economic, social and environmental problems that affect their people. However, it is a fact that these researchers face many technical, political, financial and institutional obstacles that block them fully developing their potential and impede their work having important impact on the lives of the people of those countries, especially on the most disadvantaged population. I think IRPC can help catalyzing the work of scientists in LDCs through the creation of an effective network that would improve the exchange of information and resources among scientists, both in LDCs and more developed countries. Also, IRPC could create a political voice to lead some of the needs and demands of scientists in LDCs to a solution. Environmental problems are examples of an area where IRPC could work, for instance by increasing the interchange among scientists in the search of solutions in the fields such as, new environment friendly technologies, ecotourism and organic farming.

PROFESSOR MIKE ROBINSON
Chair of Tourism Studies, Director, Centre for Tourism and Cultural Change,Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change, Sheffield Hallam University, Owen Building, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK

Knowledge and understanding are two of the most precious, and sadly often the most elusive, of world resources, and research that feeds our collective knowledge base and contributes to our understanding of how to address global social and environmental problems in differing cultural contexts, is vital. In the developing and lesser developed world where such problems are most acute, it is essential that research is actively encouraged and promoted, well funded, and of high quality. Research into increasingly important areas such as travel, tourism and cultural change will ensure that economic, social and environmental benefits are harnessed and negative impacts minimized. IRPC has an important role to play in promoting bold, high quality research in this and many other fields, in particular by encouraging transnational and interdisciplinary research collaborations, meetings and publications to encourage exciting and productive knowledge partnerships between the developed and developing world.

SUNG SOO KIM
Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-70,Korea

The researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries should ask WHO and the developed countries to support them financially to successfully perform the researches that they think are important. Also the researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries try to learn how to do researches successfully from researchers in the developed countries. IRPC should try to make research foundations that can provide the researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries with research grants. IRPC should try to make ways that can educate the researchers in developing and underdeveloped countries in the developed countries.

DAVID A. FENNELL, Ph.D.
Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, L2S 3A1

As the world's largest industry, tourism continues to flourish throughout the central (core) and peripheral regions of the world. In its wake, however, the tourism industry has created a complex array of impacts which often disharmonize social, ecological, and economic systems by serving the needs of those in the developed world at the expense of lesser developed country (LDC) people and resources (e.g., control of markets, leakage of money out of peripheral regions back to core areas, and so on). As an alternative to the dominant mass tourism model, ecotourism, as the fastest growing sector of the tourism industry, holds tremendous potential--if ethically managed--to stimulate economic growth in LDCs while also placing high value on the sustainability and integrity of natural and social systems. A key aspect of ecotourism is its focus on small scale development and the control of such development in the hands of local communities; a model which has the potential to nurture a similar approach for other industries or sectors in the creation of balanced, sustainable economies. I applaud the IRPC for recognizing the global emergence of ecotourism as an important vehicle which attempts to balance ecology, society, and economy.

DR. JOHN S. AKAMA
Department of Tourism Management, Moi University, P. O. Box 112, Eldoret, Kenya

In order to promote research in Third World countries, there is an urgent need to create increased awareness among government and private sector developers on the importance of local-based research initiatives in finding solutions to existing socio-economic problems. It is also high time that people who manage various sectors of the economy in Third World countries are informed that policy formulation and plan implementation should always be based on sound research, monitoring and evaluation. Bilateral and multilateral funding organizations should recognize and enhance the capacity of indigenous researchers to conduct research and; should also assist in the creation of linkage between researchers and developmental institutions in the Third World.

In this broader context, the role of IRPC is crucial, particularly, in identifying researchers in Third World countries and assisting them in their research endeavors. Particularly, IRPC should continue establishing network and linkage among Third World researchers and establish avenues for collaborative research and exchange of information.

In the field of tourism, it should be recognized that the industry can play a significant role in poverty reduction and overall socio-economic development in Third World countries. In this connection, there is an urgent need to initiate alternative strategies for tourism development, such as the development of community based tourism projects, village tourism and initiation of grassroots based pro-poor tourism projects in Third world countries, particularly in Africa.

DR. TIFFANY M. DOAN, Ph. D.
Biology Department, Vassar College, Box 555, 124 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604-0555

The people of third world countries are directly impacted by the problems facing researchers in their countries. Unlike researchers from the developed world, who have access to training and funding, researchers from the developing world often do not have access to such resources. It is the duty of the developed world to provide all researchers with opportunities to receive training and funding. I believe the International Research Promotion Council should have initiatives to promote this. Potential ways to accomplish this would be to provide scholarship opportunities for third world students to attend universities in other nations and to produce lists of funding opportunities available to researchers in developing countries. In this way, researchers in the third world would have the educational base and funding to advance science and tourism in their own countries.

Dr.BRITT-MAJ WIKSTROM
Kalldisvagen 2, S-187 72 TABY, Sweden

It is honorable to be nominated as a patron member of the Word Scientist Forum and the opportunity to work together with other member scientists. Researchers in developing and under developing countries are facing many problems which have direct impact on people of third world countries. Regarding promoting tourism, I believe art deserves careful examination, not as an isolated entity, but as an interaction with society. Aesthetic systems can be topics for tourism and health inquiry, discuss historical trends to predict future tourism globally, discuss new paradigms to promote global eco-tourism for the 21st century, reflect on new and effective ways of enlightening the tourist about the value of eco-tourism.

Dr.Kojiro Onizawa
Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-8575, Japan

" I have understood the objectives of IRPC. My special subject is oral and maxillofacial surgery, and I am willing to aid research in the medicine of the third world countries as much as I can."

Annikki Jonsson , RN, District Nurse, BSc, MScN, Doctoral Student
Department of Primary Care, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö-Nässjö, Sweden; Dept. of Urology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital / SU Sahlgrenska, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden, E-mail: annikki.jonsson@telia.com

IRPC´s ambition, finding as well as assisting suitable strategies, offering solutions in medicine and research and co-operating with scientists all over the world, is admirable. S preading research activities to manage the problems existing in the third world countries is a width target, so the global effort is necessary.

IRPC emphasizes the possibilities we all have for the mutual benefits and mutual respect. Researchers in science and medicine across the world are participating in this activity by interaction, co-operation and assistance practically as well as by the raised consciousness. Importance of academic location to guide researchers and promote an atmosphere of learning as well as scientific inquiry cannot be ignored.

Local researchers worldwide with local knowledge of the local needs, traditions and beliefs in local institutions are the keys both in qualitative and quantitative research by international co-operation. The present author is familiar to administration, urology, primary care, cancer care and palliative care. True knowledge contributes countries to focus on the exact problem leading to better decision making.

Throughout the world, poor and vulnerable persons do not get healthcare, they are sicker and die earlier than persons who are more privileged. It should be scientists´ and clinicians´ moral and ethical obligation to share scientific information, research knowledge for application on existing problems. IT-development is one of the tools facilitating quick information spreading and communication. The outstanding endeavor of IRPC is focusing on to make it possible for the research in the developing and underdeveloped countries, together.

Dr Stephen D. Hall
School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham,UK

The climate of scientific and medical research worldwide is increasingly dependant upon economic return. Although this poses difficulties for research scientists the world over, nowhere is the impact of this more apparent than in developing and underdeveloped countries. If true progress is to be made then research must be promoted both within developing and underdeveloped countries and in collaboration with developing countries. The work of the IRPC in ensuring that financial support is available and distributed appropriately is of fundamental importance in order to create a global balance and alleviate the burdens that currently exist.'

Dr. Midtgaard J, Quist M., PhD.
Copenhagen University Hospital, Department 7331 (UCSF), Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

In my opinion, organizations like the IRPC are essential in order to optimally exploit the potentials of sharing and distributing scientific knowledge in a time of globalization. Scientific knowledge, although embedded in local, historical and cultural contexts, is per definition anti-discriminating and should therefore not only travel across but also serve to brake down cultural and socialeconomic bounderies. Advances in health research should belong to no one and collectives effeorts are needed to create them. Moreover, knowledge is potentially empowering and empowerment of underserved populations may be one of the most substantial ways – if not the only way - to overcome the globally growing social inequality in health. This is just one of the reasons why it's an honour to be able to support and promote the important work of the IRPC.

Dr. Daniel Asrat MD, MSc. PhD.
Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa, University, P.O.Box. 9086, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

IRPC should play a role in identifying promising young scientists from Africa and supports them in their early carriers to help them become established and recognized nationally and internationally. Recognizing that science and technology capacity has not evolved to the same extent in all developing countries, IRPC should focus its support on scientific research in countries still lacking a solid based for national science and technology training and play a role in mentoring young scientists for effective a application of science and technology

Dr. Daniel Asrat MD, MSc. PhD.
Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa, University, P.O.Box. 9086, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

IRPC should play a role in identifying promising young scientists from Africa and supports them in their early carriers to help them become established and recognized nationally and internationally. Recognizing that science and technology capacity has not evolved to the same extent in all developing countries, IRPC should focus its support on scientific research in countries still lacking a solid based for national science and technology training and play a role in mentoring young scientists for effective a application of science and technology

Dr. Daniel Asrat MD, MSc. PhD.
Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Addis Ababa, University, P.O.Box. 9086, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

IRPC should play a role in identifying promising young scientists from Africa and supports them in their early carriers to help them become established and recognized nationally and internationally. Recognizing that science and technology capacity has not evolved to the same extent in all developing countries, IRPC should focus its support on scientific research in countries still lacking a solid based for national science and technology training and play a role in mentoring young scientists for effective a application of science and technology

The Objectives of IRPC include:

  1. To recognize, support and promote excellence in scientific research carried out by scientists of the Third World
  2. To promote contacts among researchers in the third world countries between them and The World scientific community
  3. To encourage research and development on the Third World problems
  4. To bring out publications related to science, technology and development in the Third World and making available online

Dr. Khalid Ahmed Al-Anazi
Assistant Consultant, Section of Adult Haematology and Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant, King Faisal Cancer Centre, King Faisal Specialist Hospital And Cancer Centre, P.O.Box: 3345, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia.

Governmental organizations, private sectors, research centres and academic institutions in developing countries, particularly the wealthy ones, should participate to a large extent in the promotion of original medical research. Global efforts are required to fascilitate an uninterrupted flow of advanced technology and development from developed to developing countries. World scientists and researchers should cooperate to manage the existing health problems and to promote research activities in the developing countries. Furthermore, original medical research in developing countries should be encouraged and supported by international and local governmental organizations, private sectors, research centres and academic institutions so as to ultimately improve the standards of medical care and health services provided to the target populations that are in need of such help.

Dr Joachim Schüz
Head, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark

Related to my own research field of epidemiology and public health, I understand that a major objective of the IRPC is to spread research results of developed countries in developing and under-developed countries in a straightforward, low-cost and expeditious way. This information flow is one important aspect of a successful planning and implementation of prevention strategies of disease. It is also an essential first step of a closer collaboration of researchers around the world. The IRPC deserves our plaudit for the promotion of this essential collaboration.

Prof.Dr. Helga Schmetzer(PhD)
Head of the Dept. for Hematopoetic Transplantations, Med3, University Hospital of Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich

A common aim of scientists of the world should be to find ways to work together on an international level. First of all ideas have to be created in cooperation about most important topics to be worked on and priorities have to be defined. In a next step the financiation by Universities, research centers, companies, e.g. has to be applicated. The realisation of the projects could be performed in labs of institutions around the world with an international group of scientists and research fellows. These efforts can be very effective, if a platform is created (by politicians, etc) to bring those internationally agitating initiators of research ideas and programs together –having always in mind the most urgent problems of humans, that can be solved by these strategies.

Dr. Hae.K.Kil, M.D
Professor, Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

The major objective of International Research Promotion Council is to manage the vital problems in the scientific and medical researches of the developing and underdeveloped countries. Information exchange, joint research and words of encouragement are important for this purpose especially in 3rd countries. In this IT oriented world, communicating online rather than offline is necessary, therefore organizing an online research group seems to be an effective way to accomplish the major objective of IRPC. I hope IRPC to play an active part in this.

Dr. Michael Rosemann
GSF Institute for Radiation Biology, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse, 85764 NEUHERBERG / Germany

In a world where natural resources become more and more limited, a successful exploitation of the intellectual potential of a country will be key to its a future prosperity. This is of even greater importance for the developing countries, which after being used for centuries as a source of cheap labor and underpriced commodities, deserve an equal participation on the global assets in the future.

But one should not consider the access of developing countries to research and development an act of sole charity. Science and technology will certainly benefit from the human potential, the creativity and intellectual capital that resides in these countries.

Prof. Dr. Constantin Papastefanou
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki 54124, GREECE

It is not possible for a person working in science and research to have access in all published papers to gain new knowledge either to improve or develop new products, processes or services, to prove the viability of new technologies and innovation-related activities offering potential economic advantages. This seems to be more critical for the research scientists of the underdeveloped countries. The International Research Promotion Council acts as a carrier in addressing the scientific, technical, wider societal and policy objectives of specific targeted research scientists in the world in progress of our life.

Dr. Keisuke Aoe
Departments of Medical Oncology, Clinical Research, NHO Sanyo National Hospital, 685 Higashi-kiwa, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-0241, Japan.

Through their noble activities, I respect the objective of International Research Promotion Council to manage or solve the vital problems existing in the field of research in science and medicine. In many fields the globalization has been advancing rapidly. Scientists of the world should together with a common aim. It will bring us more achievements.?

Dr. Mary Eaton, Ph.D
Research Service (151), Miami VAMC, 1201 NW 16th Street, Miami, FL 33125, USA

Athough there are significant differences in culture, economic aims, and management by and involvement of governments in scientific research and its advancements, the highest aims of a rational approach to science must include the spirit of collaboration among colleagues. The difficulty lies in the identification of the barriers to that co-operation and a frank analysis of a program to address and surmount them. Individual politics is a consideration but need not block the way; science can benefit the whole, as well as the individual, as long as the agents of change are sincere in their intentions. Scientists are rarely trained in the subtleties of business and macroeconomics, but since one pillar of good science is reproducibility, practical technology can spread as an outcome of that integrity. The question of 'translation' is the key. What are the ways to apply not just information, but knowledge, if not wisdom, to other countries?

Prof.Christoph C. Zielinski, M.D.
Professor of Medicine, Medical Unviersity of Vienna, Austria

The generation of scientific knowledge is the main task of academic endeavours. In the field of medicine, this should include both, basic science and academic investigations which should aim at the amelioration of diagnostic means, treatment and quality of life. Of course, the need of scientific clinical investigations varies between regions regarding infectious diseases, malignancies, endocrine or cardiovascular disorders. Thus, the transfer of scientific insights, the technics for its achievement and its translation into clinical benefit have to penetrate from wealthy nations to countries of resticted financial resources. One example for such an endeavour is the Vienna School of Clinical Reasearch (http://www.vscr.at) which I am presiding. There, we aim to teach physicians from all over the world ways to create scientific research with special emphasis upon developing countries with their very special medical needs.

Dr. Øyvind Næss
Dept. General Practice and Community Medicine, Epidemiological Section, Ullevål University Hospital, P.O. Box 1130 Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway.

'The IRPC has identified a key issue in their emphasis on how research could be made accessible in low income countries. This is a timely topic as with global communication having expanded its capacity and human workforce in many countries have become well educated, there should not be obstacles in technology and research capacity transfer between countries. This should have enormous potential to improve public health.'

Dr. Ancha Baranova
Associate Professor, Molecular Biology and Microbiology, David King Hall, MSN 3E1 George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 22030, USA.

"While it is essential for researchers in industrialized nations to help solve problems in the less privileged countries, it should also be emphasized that developed countries do not have a monopoly on innovation. Researchers in developing nations very often have key insights into scientific issues into which other scientists may not. To help global problems as a whole, the facilitation of international research must ensure that scientific collaboration be a two-way street of dialogue and interchange."

Professor Ingegerd Bergbom,
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.

"The major objective of International Research Promotion Council is to manage or solve the vital problems existing in the field of research in science and medicine in the developing countries of the world. There should be an uninterrupted flow of advanced technology and developments from developed to developing countries of the world. A global effort is extremely necessary to handle this matter effectively. Scientists of the world should work together with a common aim and channelize their research activities to formulate suitable strategies or to find out research solutions to manage the problems existing in the third world countries."

It is extremely important that there are international organisations or councils, such as International Research Promotion Council which objectives are to solve and look after vital problems that exist in the field of research and education in developing countries. Knowledge based on sound scientific principles as well as advanced technological development and financial support should be accessible for the benefit of all human beings in the world. All efforts and activities for making this possible are valuable and it is worth showing that research, knowledge, education and competence can make a difference and is not only a privilege for people in developed countries. Science aims to improve all human beings health, existence and living circumstances, which is an ethical demand and responsibility for all scientists. Therefore strategies for transition of information, knowledge, resources and exchange of experiences must be worked out and realized.

Dr.Akira Kikuchi MD, PhD
Division of Hematology / Oncology, Saitama Children's Medical Center, 2100 Magome, Iwatsuki-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 339-8551 Japan.

"People all over the world have the right to receive standardized health care and medical service equally regardless of their socio-economical status. However, the people in the third world countries do not always have opportunities to utilize such services. Medical researchers in the developing and underdeveloped countries also have the same problems in their fields in terms of difficulties to utilize advanced technology in the developed countries. Medical scientists in developed countries should pay attention to such unhappiness and make efforts to improve such situations. "

Dr. Jorge Luis Braier, MD
Hematology/Oncology Dept., Hospital de Pediatría Juan Garrahan, Combate de los Pozos 1881 (1245) Buenos Aires,Argentina.

"I wish for the world, more justice for all: I mean no starvation, and the same health and education possibilities for everybody. Important progress in health and education are needed in multiple subjects, it is fundamental for the life of millions of forgotten people, and research studies are essential to arrive to that so important goals. Networks research programs between developed and developing countries will be very important to make better the life of the human being."

Dr. Guido Sireci
Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Metodologie Biomediche, Sezione di Patologia Generale, Corso Tukory 211, 90134 Palermo, Italy.

The research in science and medicine in the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world must be implemented through collaborations involving researchers from "developed countries" like European countries, Australia, Canada, U.S.A. and Japan.The transfer of know-how in basic and applied science could induce proliferation of research in the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world.It could be done by conferences, seminars, etc. in which scientists of developed countries discuss their fields of interest with colleagues coming from poor areas.These meetings could gain at least two objectives: Colleagues coming from poor areas could know what is doing in other parts of the world and scientists coming from "developed countries" could realize collaborations with colleagues coming from underdeveloped countries where many diseases of interests (Tuberculosis for instance) are endemic.

Dr. Kouki Ohtsuka, M.D., Ph.D
Division of Clinical and Molecular Genetics, Department of Laboratory, Medicine and Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyorin University, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611, Japan

I am happy and honored to make my great efforts for the noble objective of International Research Promotion Council (IRPC). I am willing to work together eminent scientists of the world in order to manage or solve the vital problems existing in the field of cancer research in the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world. Through our activities, I hope that both the developed and the third world countries will grow up mutually.

Dr. Rosemary Louise Nixon
262 The Boulevard East Ivanhoe, Victoria, 3079, Australia

It is of utmost importance that scientists in the developed world direct their energies to improving situations in the less developed world. I am extremely fortunate to be trained in two medical specialties, dermatology and occupational medicine. I believe it is incumbent upon me to help improve outcomes in occupational dermatitis, all over the world, not just in my privileged country, Australia. One way I have been able to contribute so far is to train people from other parts of the world, which is a great source of pleasure for me, and which has led to improved outcomes in contact dermatitis in several different countries.

Dr. Stefan Moosmayer
Martina Hansens Hospital, Orthopedic department, Pb. 23, N-1306 Bærum postterminal, Norway

"Even if health problems vary considerably between developed and underdeveloped countries of the world there may be fields where medical experiences can and should be transferred. Diagnostic sonography of the musculo skeletal system (MSS) can serve as a good example. Technical equipment which is necessary for musculo skeletal sonography is relatively cheap and education in sonography of the MSS can be given easily by experienced examiners. Daily examination costs are low and short examination times will permit to examine a great number of patients per unit. Important therapeutic decisions can be taken on the basis of clinical examination together with the findings of sonography."

Dr. Cathy Hutchison
Cancer Consultant Nurse, Level 3, Office Suite 3B (Room 302), Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN

"The aims of the IRPC are commendable and have highlighted globally the issues facing health, and the challenges of promoting research activities in the developing and underdeveloped world. The importance of collaborative approaches to address the issues has been recognised, and there are real opportunities through established / establishing clinical and research networks for multiprofessional research approaches and contributions, aimed at improving the health, treatment and care in developing and underdeveloped countries".

Dr. Max Petrov
(PO Box 568), Nizhny Novgorod, 603000 Russia.

"Having gained clinical and research experience in a number of developed and developing countries, I have clearly realized that the current management of many diseases is sub optimal even in high income countries. On the other hand, as a number of developed countries and, consequently, their population is fairly limited, the majority of patients, virtually regardless of a given disease under investigation, are located in developing and underdeveloped countries. It seems that, in order to address the abundance of topical issues in the management of widespread diseases in the foreseen future, it is to researcher's from every part of the globe interested to take a part in transferring or receiving the best research methodologies and techniques. In my view, only this approach will allow us to solve the multiple health care problems in a timely manner and, thus, to treat our patients better globally. Thereby, it is my strong belief that the effort of International Research Promotion Council is a worthwhile initiative which should be fully supported."

Dr.Zahra Taheri-Kadkhoda M.D., Ph.D.
Dept. of Radiotherapy, Jubileumskliniken, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE 413 45 Göteborg, Sweden

"The rising health problems in developing and underdeveloped countries especially in the field of cancer necessitates awareness and will of the domestic governments and health organizations in promotion of research in all aspects of cancer care. The concept of IRPC could not only facilitate such an effort but also it can provide an opportunity for the scientists around the world to work together more efficiently towards meaningful global tasks in the field. Unlimited exchange of knowledge with, and access to modern research technology within the developing and underdeveloped countries are prerequisites for accomplishing the mission."

Dr. Ragnar Thygesen
University of Agder, Mailbox 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway

"Through IRPC, scientists from developed countries have an excellent opportunity to raise the awareness of in succinctly addressed issues in underdeveloped countries, such as learning difficulties, which might be caused by a variety of reasons. Scholars should work together with the common aim to bring knowledge, suitable technology and resources to children and youth in need of special educational measures."

Dr. Toshihide Kubo, M.D., Ph.D
Chief of Pediatric Department, NHO Okayama Medical Center, 1711-1 Tamasu, Okayama 701-1192, Japan

Express my sympathy to the major objective of International Research Promotion Council. Since I wish to contribute to scientific development of the developing countries, I want to participate in a joint research positively. Okayama Medical Center where I work has already made efforts to international contributions, and tried for international exchange by accepting a lot of trainees from the developing countries. I believe that a scientific network over the developing countries and the developed countries brings the happiness of mankind in the future.

Prof. Brendan Moran
Colorectal Research Unit, Basingstoke and North Hampshire Foundation Trust, Aldermaston Road, Basingstoke, Rg24 9NA, United Kingdom

"Healthcare is a global issue and whilst information technology is rapidly expanding, the expertise and resources may not match expectations. All scientists and doctors have a duty to help the less fortunate and strive to develop cost-effective, universally available healthcare. The Information Research Promotion Council is a vehicle in disseminating science and knowledge to underdeveloped and developing nations so that "Health For All" may one day be achieved. Co-operation is essential as healthcare information is an invaluable resource, available in many guises from all over the world and should be freely available and easily transferrable."

Dr. Jiro Watari, MD, PhD
Division of Upper Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1, Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya 663-8501, Japan

"That's exactly the word we wanted. We should work together and share medical and scientific information with each other. To provide those information through the internet may be easy and convenient way for that. First of all, I think that it is very important to make any electric journals accessible on the Web from anywhere in the scientific and medical world."

Dr. Prasanna K. Santhekadur
Post Doctoral Fellow, Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM), 1220 East Broad St, Room 7055, PO Box 980035, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

"I am proud to be the member of the International Research Promotion Council (IRPC). As a researcher from the developing world with the knowledge of third world science and its problems I strongly feel that third world countries need the collaborative science. IRPC is one of the few organizations dedicated to recognize and promote research in science and medicine in the whole world. The major objective of the International Research Promotion Council is to work towards solving vital problems facing in the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world by encouraging achievements in research and medicine which will assist in offering solutions for these problems. It will also boost confidence of scientists from third world countries to compete with global scientific scenario."

Prof. Mark Slevin PhD, FAHA, FIBMS, FRCPath
Professor of Vascular Biology, ICCC, St Pau Hospital, Barcelona Professor of Cell Pathology, SBCHS, Manchester Metropolitan University

"The developing and under developed countries of the world tend to be neglected in the sense that diseases prevalent within individual communities are not considered with priority by established EU and world-wide countries. The problems that need to be addressed include the necessity to attain a greater understanding of the socio-economic background to disease development, how we can implement appropriate health care and enable transfer of scientific knowledge to the countries in need to help them by collaboration achieve realistic solutions to reduce mortality. The under developed countries have higher rates of development of some of the major diseases including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and HIV and other serious viral infections all of which results in unacceptably low life expectancy and poor quality of life.Through the IRPC, we should aim to provide a mechanism through which direct collaboration with existing healthcare communities and research establishments can promote awareness of these problems and conduct supported appropriate medical and biomedical studies to help improve the living conditions of the inhabitants of these communities. The formation of a global scientific team sharing this common aim is the foundation on which the IRPV is based and the members will work together to find novel strategies and solutions to these problems."

Dr. Yoshiyuki Suzuki, MD, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Japan.

"The support from developed nations to enhance developing countries' benefit with various modern technologies is an important approach of assuring their development. This should include necessary actions in the multilateral cooperation, research' facilities access and afford flexibility in exchanging necessary information. Since I have been participating in the activity of donating medical equipments and the support of the medical education to the developing country, I do respect the objectives of the IRCP and confer continuous support."

Prof. Dr. Dirk Rades, MD, PhD
Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Germany

"Scientists from all over the world have the moral obligation to collaborate and to share their expertise in order to provide the best available care to patients and the best available research everywhere. The International Research Promotion Council plays a key role in achieving this important and challenging goal. Therefore, the IRPC needs the support from scientists, in particular from those of developed countries, in order to channelize and facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from the developed countries to developing and underdeveloped countries."

Dr. Roberto Cilia, M.D.
Specialista in Neurologia, Centro per la malattia di Parkinson, via Bignami 1, 20126, Milano, Italy.

"It is time to translate words into real actions for our planet. It has been stated that 'Global poverty is an issue that concerns each of us – and the damage inflicted by extreme poverty is nowhere more visible than in relation to health' and we should start sharing scientific knowledge and medical experiences to help relieving this gap between developed and developing countries. I believe that the effort to build a strong international scientific community collaborating on commongoals might help in raising awareness on under-diagnosed and under-treated diseases in low-income countries and finally raising funds to health-related projects in these world regions. Every team in every country of the developed world may add a brick onto this wall and collaborate with local communities so that step-by-step we will be able face and hopefully win this challenge. This is exactly the direction IRPC is working and the objective everybody should always keep in mind."

Dr. Takahiko Naka, MD, PhD
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, 1-3-1 Kuzuharatakamatsu, Kokuraminami-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, 800-0296, Japan

"I agree with the comment by IRPC that technology should be introduced from developed to developing countries. Since ancient times, all the people in the world have learned science from more-advanced areas. I think this is the beginning of the new science. "

Dr. Takaaki Arigami, MD, PhD
Department of Surgical Oncology and Digestive Surgery, Field of Oncology, Course of Advanced Therapeutics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520, Japan

"I understand that the major objective of International Research Promotion Council (IRPC) is to manage or solve the vital problems of the scientific and medical researches in the developing and underdeveloped countries of the world. Therefore, IRPC is an important organization as the matchmaker between developed and the 3rd world countries. I hope that the collaboration through IRPC would enable a new solutions for medical problems in the developing and underdeveloped countries."

Dr. Jorge Luis Braier
Hematology/Oncology Dept. Hospital de Pediatría Juan Garrahan. Combate de los Pozos 1881 (1245) Buenos Aires. Argentina.

"I agree completely with the objectives of the International Research Promotion Council. As you can see in my CV, it is clear that Hospital Garrahan and myself, we share the same aims of IRPC. I wish for the world, more justice for all: I mean no starvation, and the same health and education possibilities for everybody. Important progress in health and education are needed in multiple subjects, it is fundamental for the life of millions of forgotten people, and research studies are essential to arrive to that so important goal. Networks research programs between developed and developing countries will be very important to make better the life of the human being."

Professor. Peter Brown
Professor of Neurology and Head of Sobell Department of Motor Neurosciences and Movement Disorders, Institute of Neurology,University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG

"I whole heartedly support the International Research Promotion Council in its aim to encourage sharing of scientific and technological advances across the globe, so that developed and developing countries both stand to gain. In equality of access to scientific and technological advances is morally indefensible."

Dr. Christian Bonansco, PhD
Laboratorio de Neurofisiología, Centro de Neurobiologia y Plasticidad del Desarrollo Depto. Fisiología, Fac. Ciencias, U. Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso-Chile

"One of the main problems faced by developing countries in Sciences, is the small budget to fund local research, in addition to the small number of governmental and nongovernmental organizations to promote the development of basic science and applied each country. As a result, only a small percentage of scientific projects that apply every year in countries of the region, including Chile, are funded. Many of the proposed lines, even when presented with the internationally recognized quality and originality, are not supported. In this sense, organizations such as IRPC, offers an opportunity to channel international collaboration between scientists from emerging countries, with centers of excellence in developed countries, which materializes through the exchange of technology and experience in finding solutions to common problems. This requires an effort of the international scientific community, aiming to increase the number of financing programs to which researchers can apply in our countries, directly promoting the development of those emerging lines that represent a real contribution to the knowledge of their respective areas. In this sense, the objectives of the IRPC fully interpret the scientific community in our countries, and a commitment to the pursuit of scientific knowledge without frontiers."

Professor Rodney J. Scott, PhD, PD, FRCPath, FHGSA
Head of the Discipline of Medical Genetics, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Australia.

The solution of man kinds problems must be from a united effort, which cuts across national and international boundaries. By working together and allowing people to have the opportunity of solving their problems themselves, be it with the use of advanced technology or not, solutions to the major difficulties confronting humanity will be forthcoming. Doing nothing is not an option for the industrialized world since we cannot afford for a greater growth in disparity than we already have. It is through collaboration and cooperation in research where significant breakthroughs will be made that will benefit not only those living in the third world but also mankind in general.

PROF. GEORGIA STEPHANOU
Professor in Genetics, Division of Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology, Department of Biology,University of Patras,Patras, GREECE
E-mailo: geosteph@biology.upatras.gr

"In this very difficult time for our planet with enormous problems such as wars, terrorism, starving and low medical care in several countries as well as serious threatens for the Environment, science and scientists seem able to propose the ways to restrain at least some of them. However science, including medicine, in developing and underdeveloped countries stays at a lower level in comparison with the developed ones. This is not due to the lack of human potential but mainly due to the very bad economies of the third world countries, resulting in low or lack support to science. Therefore it seems that the collaboration between scientists of developed and underdeveloped countries, is an important matter especially in the field of health and medical care. From this point of view IRPC plays an important role to push forward the flow of science and knowledge from the developed to underdeveloped countries and this trial must be supported by the scientist of allover the world. Every human has right to health, well-being and medical care independently to nationality, color or religious and to this direction IRPC works hard."

Prof. Constantinos Deltas
Professor of Genetics, Chairman, Department of Biological Sciences, Head, Laboratory of Molecular and Medical Genetics, University of Cyprus, Kallipoleos 75, 1678 Nicosia, Cyprus,
Tel: +357-22-892882 (Mobile: +357-99-442042
E-mailo: Deltas@ucy.ac.cy
Website:www.ucy.ac.cy/biology/staff/CDeltas/cdeltas.html

"I certainly agree that more effort and money should be directed in enhancing research activities in poor and underdeveloped countries. This could be partly achieved by encouraging and funding common research projects that will involve successful groups from developed or European countries and groups from underdeveloped countries. This in itself will assist in transferring knowledge and expertise as well as exploit unique material and resources for research purposes aimed at solving global medical problems."

Professor Alan Carr
Professor of Clinical Psychology, University College Dublin, Ireland

Here are the comments you requested Famine, disease, and illiteracy are devastating problems in many third world countries. I strongly believe that these types of problems can be effectively addressed with scientific, medical and technological solutions. I fully support the International Research Promotion Council in its mission of bringing significant research advances from developed to developing countries to deal with major third world problems.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DIANNE WYNADEN RN, PhD
Associate Professor, Curtin University of Technology GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845,Western Australia, Australia.
Phone: + 61 8 92662203

The sharing of advanced technologies and developments in science and medicine between developed and developing countries remains a priority to successfully eradicate the many preventable diseases that exist within the global community. Increased clinical and research collaboration can also reduce the impact of disabling and debilitating health conditions which currently add significantly to the global burden of disease. While research in this area remains a priority, improved health outcomes in developing countries can also be facilitated through global research and clinical collaborations that: enhance the educational and development opportunities for key health professional groups; assist in translating knowledge and evidence based outcomes into health practice changes at a local level; utilise an integrated interdisciplinary approach that recognises the contributions to health and wellbeing made by each health professional group; and, engage local communities in the planning, implementation and evaluation of innovative models of health delivery that are relevant, sustainable, culturally appropriate and actively supported at a local level.

Engaging local communities is significant as social factors play a vital role in influencing health outcomes and iinterdisciplinary research collaborations will help to identify a range of psychosocial, environmental, biological and genetic factors that can be modified to improve the health of individuals and communities. For example, as members of the interdisciplinary health team nurses are at the forefront of the delivery of health services and on many occasions they are the first point of contact from people seeking assistance for a health related issue. As such they are in a strong position to influence community health outcomes from both a clinical and team level while contributing to the generation of knowledge and understanding through research. This is evidenced by the increasing global contributions made by nurses to the development of evidence-based practice and innovations in health care. Therefore, collaboration that empowers and educate all health professional groups and engages at the community level with individuals and families will demonstrate significant health and research outcomes that benefit the global community. The health and well being of the global community is the responsibility of all health professionals and a unified effort is required to improve the health outcomes of developing countries.

Chapter Highlights

  • Australian Chapter:- Dr Pam McGrath and her team, International Program of Psycho-Social Health Research (IPP-SHR), have worked closely with IRPC on a range of research projects.
  • Australian Chapter:- Hamish Holewa, IPP-SHR has contributed to the development of IRPC's journal, the Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer, a HERDC recognised, peer-reviewed, multi-disciplinary cancer journal.
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